Tag Archives: great leadership

Posthumous Leadership

Posthumous Leadership

Posthumous Leadership

Posthumous Leadership

Posthumous Leadership We all have heroes living and past.  My dad was a hero of mine, a great influence on me and he had a huge impact on my core values.  Because of that, my philosophical foundation of leadership is built on lessons I learned from him, as well as others.  My dad passed away over 20 years ago, but that does not diminish the impact he had/has on me.  How you lead is dependent on who you follow.

Abraham Lincoln is another person who has had a major impact on me and my philosophical foundation of leadership.  Considered one of the greatest Presidents in American history, President Lincoln has influenced many, who, like me, never met the man because we were born many years after his death.  Posthumous leadership is an incredible phenomenon.

I love college basketball, particularly March Madness.  I recently learned of an incredible story of posthumous leadership about one of the winningest men’s college basketball coaches in the history of the game.

Posthumous LeadershipCoach Dean Smith coached men’s basketball for 36 seasons at the University of North Carolina.  Players he coached include Michael Jordan and James Worthy among others.  When he retired from coaching in 1997, he was the winningest Division I men’s basketball coaches with 879 career victories.  Two of his teams won national titles, one in 1982 and one in 1993.  Coach Smith had a reputation for winning.  He also had a reputation for caring for his players.  That appreciation of players transcended his life when he passed away at the age of 83.

In his will, he left every letterman he had ever coached at the University of North Carolina $200.  A $200 check was sent to those players along with a note that read “enjoy dinner out, complements of Coach Dean Smith.”  Coach Smith will forever be all about his players.

What will your posthumous leadership gift be?

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Smile

She’s a Great Leader, Always Smiling…

She’s a Great Leader, Always Smiling…

Smile

Have you ever been around a person who is always positive, always smiling? When you interact with someone who’s in a good mood, a leader or otherwise, it’s contagious. Emotions are shared thru verbal and non-verbal communication. Being engaged with someone in a good mood will cause you to subconsciously begin to copy their body language, their tone of voice and facial expressions. Once you start mimicking these behaviors physically, you will actually begin to feel those positive emotions. Research indicates that when you smile, it elevates your mood and those around you.

Sigal Barsade, Ph.D., a psychologist at Yale, conducted a study to research this concept. A group of volunteers were assigned a task. Privately, Dr. Barsade instructed one group member to act overtly positive. She then recorded the interactions of the group members and tracked the emotions of each individual before and after each session. What she found was that when the positive person entered the room, his cheerful mood was mimicked by the rest of the group almost immediately. In addition, individual performance increased and the group’s ability to achieve its goal also improved.

Looking for greater success? The next time you walk into a meeting, take a look in the mirror to see what your face is saying. A simple smile could transform you and those around you.

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Half-Empty, Half-Full, What a Crock!

By Bill Auxier, Ph.D.

I think everyone is familiar with the question “Is the glass half-empty or is the glass half-full?”  The insinuation is that those who see the glass as half-empty are negative thinkers and those who see the glass half-full are positive thinkers.  What a crock!

Half-full or half-empty

Instead of looking at how much water versus how much air is in the glass, why not look at the glass.  If you have an 8 ounce glass with 4 ounces of water in it, it is either half-empty or half-full.  If you pour all of that water into a 4 ounce glass, that glass is totally full.  If you pour those same 4 ounces of water into a 16 ounce glass, there is more air than water.  But what if you could add water?  Or what if the glass contains no water at all?  Maybe it’s time to move on!

There is a time for positive thinking and there is a time for negative thinking.  A positive mind set can provide inspiration in a difficult situation.  A positive attitude can move mountains against great odds.  A negative attitude serves us well when we need to get to the truth.  You don’t want a radiologist who sees a dark spot on your MRI saying, “Oh, I’m sure it’s nothing.”  You want him to get to the truth and not gloss over that dark spot with unsubstantiated positivity.  The same goes for a referee during a football game.  A referee can’t think, “I’m sure he didn’t mean to break the rules” and let the play continue without calling a penalty.  If he did, there would be riots!

We get so caught up in the positive/negative thinking we don’t even consider the glass.  What would a different glass do to the situation?  What would adding water do?  What would pouring some, if not all of the water out of the glass do?  Don’t get so wrapped up in the positive/ negative aspect of thinking that you can’t see the entire picture.

Effective leaders know when to see the glass half-full.  Effective leaders know when to see the glass half-empty.  Great leaders look at the glass to see if a different size or shape is needed.  Great leaders understand when it is time to pour some if not all of the water out of the glass.  Great leaders know when the glass needs to be filled to overflowing.  Great leaders don’t just focus on whether the glass is half-empty or half-full, great leaders see the bigger picture.

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